CT-Scan Hearth.....

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In the future, CT scanners might create three-dimensional images of coronary arteries to show constrictions even better.
















With a CT scan, you're lying on a research table that can move through the scanner.
Multislice: More slices at once
In 1971, the first CT scanner took hours to create an image. That wasn't fast enough for the day-to-day practice of the hospital. Years later, there were scanners that were useful, but especially for non-moving organs like the brain. Pictures of the heart, which beats and interferes with breathing, were blurred and unclear. That changed with the introduction of the multislice CT scan in the 1990s. The idea, as the name multislice says, was to increase the speed by scanning more slices at the same time. There were scanners with successively 4, 8, 16, 32 and 40 detectors, which also worked faster and faster. By now, these scanners are already very outdated.
Even a scanner with 64 detectors is not good enough for the moving
heart. Scanning often takes numerous seconds and therefore a number of heartbeats. The best images are taken during the resting phase of the heart, the diastole, a phase that lasts less than a second. With too much movement of the heart, the pictures become unusable. If the person in the CT scanner has a heart rate above 60 per minute, he gets a beta blocker, a commonly used blood pressure suppressor. A beta blocker not only lowers blood pressure but also slows down the heart rhythm. The wait is for CT scanners to be ready within one second, the duration of one heartbeat.

























CT scan
A CT scan cuts a body part into slices, but is also able to rejole the cross-sections into a three-dimensional image.
Less and less
X-rays Disadvantage of the first generation of CT scanners is that the scanned person is exposed to relatively much X-rays: one CT scan was about as stressful as 200 chest x-rays at the time. This has been greatly improved with the advent of faster scanners, but in certain cases no CT scans are made to be sure. For example, a woman who is pregnant will be chosen for a different imaging technique.


Calcium
score Because calcium (calcium) X-rays do not pass through, this substance can be recognized as a white spot on an X-ray. If you have such a white spot in a coronary artery, you probably suffer from artery disease, also mistakenly called arteriosclerosis. The study measuring calcium levels in the coronary arteries results in a calcium score. A CT scan is used for a calcium score.

















 
CT scan
Reconstruction (CT scan) of a heart
with healthy coronary arteries In the daily practice of the hospital, cross-sections are used in black and white, not 3D reconstructions as seen here on the left.
A. Left descending artery
(LAD) B. Right
coronary artery
(RCA) C. Aorta D. Pulmonary Artery